{Family at Large} Plimoth Plantation

The last Free Fun Friday of the summer season…  Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  It was our second visit, and the weather was fantastic – sunny and warm.  Well worth the rush around in the morning and the long, long drive.

The Wampanoag Homesite is the kids’ favourite part of the museum.  The native use of nature appeals enormously to kids (and Mama, too).  The kids tried out one of the mashoons (dugout canoe):

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

And we admired the detail of the head of one of the paddles (so lovingly carved):

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

And one of the native interpreters explained how mashoons, nets, harpoons, and fishing spears were made and used:

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

The kids are itching to try building their own models of Wampanoag summer and winter houses.  Their larger winter house was called the “Nash Wetu” which means “Three Fires”.  One of the more clever fire pit ideas I’ve come across, each fire pit represents one of the generations sheltered by the roof.  It could comfortably fit our family with room to spare.  Quite snug.

We ventured along the woodland path and up the 27 steps to the English Settlement. It is easy to imagine Native and English inhabitants fishing here:

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

 

The museum was crowded, and there was plenty to see, but I was most captivated by the details.  The moss growing on a thatched roof:{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

 

A gossamer web hung from the eaves:

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

But then, of course, there is the view from the top of the hill:

{Family at Large} | Plimoth Plantation

 

The interpreters in both areas of the museum are fantastic, friendly, and remain in-character.  That presents a wonderful challenge to visitors.  I think that the folks appreciate carrying on a conversation with intrepid visitors. 🙂

Since our first visit, we have discovered that we are descended from two Mayflower passengers – John Howland and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland.  We were thrilled to “meet” John at one of the homes in the street.  He was round back tending his cow, who was expecting to deliver a calf any day.  We thanked him for hanging on tightly when he fell overboard.  He told us to thank God for His provision.  😉  You know we do.  If he had drowned, we wouldn’t be here right now.  Our existence quite literally hung by a thread (or a rope).

Next time we visit Plymouth, we plan to visit the other Plimoth display, Mayflower II, as well as Pilgrim Hall for some more genealogy research, and the Jabez Howland House to see where Elizabeth lived after John’s passing.