{Making a Home}

Table of Plenty

{Making a Home} | Table of Plenty

An early Christmas present for our family.  We were able to purchase a cast-off table from the Boston Public Library. Twelve feet by four feet of solid oak.  It was put into our trailer by forklift.  It wasn’t until we got it home that we realized WHY they used a forklift.  It.  Is.  Heavy.

Brian and the boys dismantled it and the girls helped them muscle it into the house.  It was quite a feat, made only slightly easier by the use of dowels through the electrical outlet holes in the tabletop.

It really fills the room up nicely.  And we have plenty of room around it for company and for our ever-expanding family.

Table of Plenty

Out with the old…

Table of Plenty

Dancing while we wait…

Table of Plenty

 

Table of Plenty

 

Table of Plenty

 

Table of Plenty

 

Table of Plenty

 

Table of Plenty

Table of Plenty

Isn’t it beautiful?

{Making a Home} | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

I think it is true what they say about the adoption process causing similar symptoms to pregnancy.  I think that I am nesting.  Certainly, it also coincides with warm weather, and settling in to living in the farmhouse.  The temporary schoolroom is finished and I’m letting it steep a little before we dig in and really give it a work out.

Last week, we got some rain that was enough to keep everyone out of the field.  It was a perfect opportunity to get the top of the hutch painted and installed in the pantry.

I stayed out of the way and looked around for a pretty crocheted trim to use for shelf lace.  I found a beautiful French crochet pattern that reminds me of wheat sheaves.  I’m working on transcribing the pattern from a crochet chart into a written pattern to share.

I bought new drawer pulls in an oiled bronze-looking finish, and I found some tension rods to fit the openings in the lower part of the hutch.  I want to make some curtains to hide some of the bits and pieces stored there.

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

 

It just need curtains for the bottom, and shelf lace for the top shelves.

Making a Home | Of Pantries and Shelf Lace

Check back here on the blog for the finished translated and written pattern.

This pretty hutch has been around awhile.  Brian’s brother made it for their parents, we received it a few years ago.  The pretty glass doors couldn’t hold up to our heavy use, and one of the lower doors developed a funny bow.  So we decided to give it a makeover and repurpose it.  Look around at what you have, or what you can find.  It doesn’t have to be costly to make your home lovely and functional.

{Making a Home} | Temporary Schoolroom: Finished!

C’mon in and have a look around.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

Our cultural studies basket, set up with the India resources.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

St. Anthony, a gift from my mom, watching over the children.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

Papa’s liturgical books get a special roost.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

The nature table. Not filled up yet. We’re making a new chalkboard, too. This one was not meant for heavy use.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

When the mantel comes back into the room, we will use it for our liturgical year displays.  We still need some artwork on the walls, and to change out the beautiful overhead light fixture for something that allows more light.  But it’s pretty wonderful.  Thanks be to God!

ETA::  Most everything you see here was thrifted or gifted.  Anything we bought new, was bought at at a discount place.  Everything was painted to match, so what looks like a large matched set, wasn’t.  Many of our Montessori materials are handmade, except for the pink and blue rods and the set of bells in the green cartons – those were purchased, used, from a fellow homeschooler.  You CAN do this in your own home, if you can spare the space.  I promise.

**Our favourite little saint peggies were made for us by Catholic Folk Toys

{Making a Home} | Temporary Schoolroom

This past week, we have been setting up a temporary schoolroom for the children.  Since moving into the farm, we had used the dining room as our main learning space.  This has proved to be far from ideal.  I’m not sure if it is  the ‘newness’ of the space, or if there is some other subconscious movement afoot.  I crave order – visual, temporal, physical order.  I made the decision to temporarily sacrifice my studio space for the children’s schoolroom.

Brian and I took William with us to the little house to collect some more furniture pieces.  Everyone helped get them all moved in and cleaned up.  We have been refilling the shelves a little at a time as I try to work out our new organization.

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

Making a Home | Temporary Schoolroom

We started with our most treasured books: The Harvard Classics and The Great Books, and the enormous Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary that my mom gave me for my birthday when I was a gal.

It won’t do for the long term as it is much too small for everyone to work comfortably in for very long, but my hope is that it will allow us to work over the summer, when outdoor portraits are more prevalent, as are event shoots.  Perhaps there will be enough extra at some point this summer to allow us to finish the space we had originally intended for a schoolroom – an almost-500 sq. ft. space in the attached carriage house.

{Making a Home} | Someday

While I was rummaging through my bits and pieces, I came across this piece of lace.  I made it way back before Brian and I were married.  I folded it up and put it into a box with some lavender for my “someday” house.  The dream house.

Someday | Springtime Filet Crochet Runner

Shortly after we welcomed our first child, we became an Air Force family.  And that lace just stayed in the box, and was joined by other pieces I made over the years.  I can remember a friend remonstrating with me over keeping those pieces squirreled away for our “someday” house.

“Use them now!” she said.  “What on earth are you saving them for?  Make your home beautiful now.  Enjoy them.”

I didn’t take her advice.  I kept them in that box.  For two decades I saved the lace pieces that I had made.  I am glad that I did.  Now that my fingers are unpredictable, it is possible I won’t be able to crochet replacements.

But this spring, this pretty piece of lace will sit on my beautiful buffet (the one we bought at the thrift store for $25), and remind me of the days when I was young and dreaming of a husband and family… and our “someday” house.  Someday has arrived.

Someday | Springtime Filet Crochet Runner

%d bloggers like this: