Homeschooling

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

Three part cards are an important element of Montessori materials.  They are extremely versatile in that you can use them as aids in a wide variety of subject areas.  Use them for maths, reading, science, geography… anything.  And they are very simple to make and to customize to your family’s needs.  You can copy and paste images to trace or print onto your cards, or, if you are particularly handy with a paintbrush or coloured pencils, you can create your own artwork.

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

For simplicity’s sake, I made colour nomenclature cards for my littlest ones to work with.  They are super-quick to make and you probably have the materials right there at home.

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

  • 12 index cards (or cut your own from white or cream cardstock)
  • watercolour paints
  • brushes
  • water
  • permanent marker
  • scissors
  • laminating sheets and laminator (optional)

I chose to do primary and secondary colours, but you can do as many as you’d like.  Add in brown, black and white, make tertiary colour cards…  I just mixed my own from what I had here.

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

You want to paint squares of each colour on pairs of cards – two red ones, two blue ones, etc.  When they are dry, print the names of the colours on the cards.  In hindsight, I should have printed ours in D’Nealian handwriting since that’s what I’m teaching them.  Easily done over later.

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

Now take one set of cards and cut them in half.  You now have three part cards – one complete card set to be used as the control cards, one set of colours, one set of printed colour names.  I feel that it is a really good idea to laminate the cards if you can.  it is spendy, however.  Laminating makes the cards last much longer, and you can wipe them clean in case a baby brother gets ahold of them while snacking. 🙂
{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards
Alternately, you could paint decoupage medium (like Mod Podge) over the front and back of each card.  You’ll probably want to do several coats, and probably before cutting the cards.

Now, to use the materials, show your little one all of the cards – controls and their matching picture and name cards.  Show them how they match up, that the letters in the words match the ones on the control cards.  Now, let your little one try.  Take up all of the ‘cut’ cards and mix them around.  Leave the control cards out at first.  Let her match them up.  Let her make mistakes and then ask if everything matches exactly.  Point out errors so that she can understand what to look for next time.

Eventually, she will be able to recognize by sight which words go with which colours, without using the control cards.  And she will start to be able to pick the words out of books she’s reading with you.

{Made for Learning} | Three Part Cards

You can do the same with letters and sounds, numbers and their qualities, shapes, natural science, history – whatever you can think of.  This is also a fun way of introducing English as a second language to an older child (which we will soon be doing), or of introducing a foreign language to your children.

I would love to see the cards you come up with.  Send me a link when you make some!

A Sympathetic Touch

One of the greatest pleasures for me, as a homeschool mom, is to witness these moments of sympathy and mercy between my children.  James was struggling with his math lesson, and Carrie stopped what she was doing, leaned over and helped him out.  And, as I think you can see, they were both blessed by the giving and receiving of kindness.  And so was I.

We don’t get performance reports, as homeschool teachers.  We have to be nourished by times like these.  I am so happy that I was able to capture this one to share.

 

jamesatwork1

 

jamesatwork2

 

jamesatwork3

 

jamesatwork4

 

jamesatwork5

 

“…like Ariel released from his tree prison, a beautiful human being leaps out of many a human prison at the touch of sympathy .” – Charlotte Mason

{Made for Learning} A Pink Tower

The pink tower is a ubiquitous Montessori learning material.  It is a sensorial tool used to teach preschoolers about visual spatial relationship.  It also prepares them for mathematics and hones fine motor skills.

You will need::

  • Wooden blocks in 1/2″, 3/4″, 1″, 1 1/2″, 2″, 2 1/2″, 3″, 3 1/2″, 4″ and 5″
  • Pink paint or dye
  • sponge or bristle paint brushes
  • beeswax polish (we make our own)
  • optional: 6″ wood square 1/2″ thick, square rod 18″ long, four 1/2″ blocks (to make the stand)

pinktower1

  • Mix up your paint or dye.  I’m using milk paint in white and barn red (salem red would also work) at a ratio of 75% white, 25% red.
  • Check your blocks over and give them a sanding to make them smooth.
  • Use a tack rag or soft, damp cloth to remove dust.
  • Paint your blocks on 3 sides and set aside to dry.
  • Repeat with remaining three sides. This ensures that you don’t get fingerprints!
  • Paint additional coats if you feel they need it.
  • When the blocks are all dry, polish with your beeswax polish.  I like to do 2-3 coats.
  • Stack and enjoy working!

 

Pink towers – ready made – can cost up to $40 each.  This homemade tower cost me under $20 to create and was such fun to make!

You can buy your wood blocks at CraftParts.

Summer Days

I’ve been so busy with adoption paperwork and fundraising, farm stuff, and homeschool preparations that I haven’t had time for posting. At least, I haven’t had as much time as I had hoped that I would.

Summer is passing so quickly.  And summer looks like it is going to be cut short if the trees around the place are anything to go by. Yellows, oranges, and reds are already popping up.

We are so grateful to be here in this place.  It is such a lot of hard work and we’re still learning so much about the land and how to make this farm work.  But we are blessed.  Just so blessed to be here.

How are you doing? What is happening at your place?

Wonderland

Wonderland

Wonderland

Wonderland

{Making a Home} | Temporary Schoolroom: Finished!

C’mon in and have a look around.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

Our cultural studies basket, set up with the India resources.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

St. Anthony, a gift from my mom, watching over the children.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

Papa’s liturgical books get a special roost.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

The nature table. Not filled up yet. We’re making a new chalkboard, too. This one was not meant for heavy use.

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

{Making a Home} | Schoolroom

When the mantel comes back into the room, we will use it for our liturgical year displays.  We still need some artwork on the walls, and to change out the beautiful overhead light fixture for something that allows more light.  But it’s pretty wonderful.  Thanks be to God!

ETA::  Most everything you see here was thrifted or gifted.  Anything we bought new, was bought at at a discount place.  Everything was painted to match, so what looks like a large matched set, wasn’t.  Many of our Montessori materials are handmade, except for the pink and blue rods and the set of bells in the green cartons – those were purchased, used, from a fellow homeschooler.  You CAN do this in your own home, if you can spare the space.  I promise.

**Our favourite little saint peggies were made for us by Catholic Folk Toys

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