Reflections

parable

Parable

Every once in a while a reading from Mass will stick with me.  Really stick.  It gets into my heart and mind.  I look it over, think it over, dream it over.  Yesterday’s Gospel (Mt. 13: 24-43) was just such a reading.

parable

It resonated with me because it illustrates for me how we faith-full bloggers and social media mavens ought to approach our time and efforts online.  We should be sowing good seed.  That doesn’t mean proselytizing everyone.  It means being the leavening.  Lifting people up.  Being positive, comforting, joyful.  Loving everyone.  Willing their good.

Too many of my Catholic friends feel that they must pull up the weeds.

Jesus teaches, in yesterday’s reading from the Gospel that we are to work gently, quietly, faithfully.  He tells us this using three different parables.  The parable of the wheat and weed suggests that in pulling up the weeds – the people who are doing the will of Satan – we may also destroy ourselves and be good for nothing.  At harvest, the wheat and weeds will be sorted out by the angels.

Trust that the wheat seed will grow and thrive. 

“The kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed…”  The Gospel of Life is small and humble.  It is simple.  Yet when it is nurtured, it grows into something great that outshines all other worldly messages.  When we show, through sharing our lives, the goodness of God, and when people witness our gentle ways, that mustard seed will grow into something glorious, and we will attract the ‘birds of the air’, who will come and ‘collect seed’ and spread it somewhere else.  Our branches are the people who share our posts or status updates, the birds are those who are inspired by us to write their own blogs and inspirational messages.

Grow where you are planted, let your branches spread wide, and welcome those who will share your inspiration.

“The kingdom of heaven is like yeast…”  When we share the simple message of love with our readers, when we are living a small life taken up with mothering and being faithful partner to our husbands, it can seem like we aren’t making impact in the world.  Not so.  The third parable tells of a woman making loaves of bread.  If you’ve made a yeast bread before, you know that the measure of yeast is very small compared with that of flour.  Yet when water is added and it is left to prove, and when we knead the dough, that little bit of yeast lifts the dough to twice (or more) what it would be without leavening.  Sharing your life with readers, your small faith-filled life, uplifts others.  We are small compared with the world, compared with ‘popular society’, yet our small voice can uplift it. Without our small voices, our humble lives of faith and faithfulness, society won’t grow at all.

Let the world knead on over and around us, it will allow our uplifting message to make a greater impact.

We don’t need to be big or ‘special’.  We only need to RECOGNIZE the beauty of every day life for the marvelous, precious gift that it is, and then share that.  Be grateful and joyful in the sharing.  Be honest about the trials in life.  We all have them and it is good to acknowledge that.  But seek the blessing in the trial and share it so that others may be uplifted in their own sufferings, and, in turn, share the blessings in their own difficulties with others.

These are how we reveal the Kingdom of Heaven.

This is how we shine like the sun.

 

 

{These Forty Days} | A Journey Begins: Lent Through the Eyes of Mary

I started writing this story back in 2008 on my original lenten blog.  It has been on my heart, though I had set it aside.  I wasn’t sure that it was a story that anyone cared to read.  And then our hard drive crashed awhile back, I feared that the original had been lost forever.  And I let it go…  Until a friend sent me a message asking about it, and whether I had written any more.  Six years later.  It had touched her and she saved a copy.  I asked her if she could send it to me.  And lo! she found it in the archives of my old blog and sent the link.  Here it is.  I hope that it blesses you as much as it did me in re-reading it.

lavender

She stands by the doorway holding in her hands a sack of bread and dried figs, and an extra robe to keep Him warm. He has said that he must leave on an important journey, one that will fulfill the Will of His Father. There isn’t much time to prepare, and she remembers the story of her ancestors fleeing into the desert, without enough time to even allow the bread to rise. She smiles. Her heart swells with love for Him. He has grown into a fine man. Joseph would be proud.

He comes in from bathing in the well, His hair is still wet and His robe smells of lavender and sunshine, just as His clothes have done since He was a babe. Once again, her heart overflows.

“I have packed you some bread and some figs so that you won’t be hungry. And here is an extra robe to keep you warm. These spring nights can be so cold,”

“Woman”, he says smiling “you spoil me.”

“Yes, but it is only because I love you so”, Mary smiles back.

He takes the sack and the robe tenderly from her hands. She gazes up into His soft brown eyes, those beautiful eyes, then reaches up and tweaks His beard.

“Kol tuv”, she says.

He reaches for her hand, which is still resting on his cheek, and squeezes it.

“L’hitraot”, He replies with a wink, and steps out into the lane.

The neighbours are busily going about their daily business. Some look up and wave a greeting to Jesus as He sets out. Mary watches Him make his way down the street. He stops at the end of the lane to talk to a little girl. Her mother, Rivka has been very ill and Mary reminds herself to stop by with some lentil soup.

She wakes from her reverie in time to see Jesus hand his sack of food to the child, laying his hand on her head as if in blessing. He tosses His robe over one shoulder and walks on, the sun creating an aureole in the curls of His hair.

She feels a bitter sting in her nose and a tear rolls from the corner of her eye. She wipes it away with her veil, not understanding why she should be so emotional. She gathers herself, takes a deep breath of the fragrant spring air and steps back into the house to attend to her chores…

*Kol tuv – Be well, L’Hitraot – See you soon

© 2008 Nissa Gadbois

Sisters

I am an only child.  I have only experienced sisterhood through  watching my daughters. What a special blessing.

sisters2

 

sisters3

sisters

“For there is no friend like a sister
In calm or stormy weather;
To cheer one on the tedious way,
To fetch one if one goes astray,
To lift one if one totters down,
To strengthen whilst one stands”
― Christina Rossetti

 

Into the Desert

Into the Desert

Lent is approaching.  It has been my favourite season for many years.  I love the long, quiet journey to Easter.  The plainness, the dryness.  The triumph of the Triduum and Easter.  Just love it.

It’s almost time to start saving onion skins for the krashanky.  It is time to pour Easter candles and get them ready to send out.

I hope that this is the year to learn to write pysanky like these beautiful eggs written by Heather of Heather’s Homestead.

Into the Desert

Into the Desert

It is time to think about how I will count down to Easter with the little ones.

Time to discern how God is calling us to be restored, renewed, nourished so that we may spend our Lenten journey growing, hidden beneath the surface, and burst forth into bloom at Eastertide.

These days of your favor
leave a blessing as you pass
on me and all your people.
Turn to us, Lord God,
and we shall turn to you. – excerpted from a meditation by Victor Hoagland, C.P

Time to ask God polish the old bloom off and make us shiny…

Into the Desert

{An old piece of denim used to polish the bloom off of beeswax candles, makes them look like new.}

There and Back Again

I’m home from my second kidney procedure.  The stone was removed {thank goodness!} and the stent is gone.  Recovery so far has been rougher than expected.  The pain is about the same as what brought me to the ER a few weeks ago.  It should improve in a couple of days.  In the meantime, I’m on heavy meds again, which makes me sleepy.

So thankful to have it all behind me now and we’re all looking forward to getting on with things!

Thank you so much for your thoughts and prayers, and especially to those who have emailed or PM’d Cat or Brian with your good wishes.

A note to those of you who make prayer shawls:  I have been wrapped in my prayer shawl throughout this recent health challenge.  It was made for and given to me nearly 7 years ago during another particularly awful flare.  I treasure it.  I can feel the prayers and blessings offered for me while it was being made, and after it was completed.  It, along with my prayer rope and the beautiful rosary tenner made for me by my friend Anne, are my constant companions in times of illness.  Just know that what you are creating is SO special.  Keep up the ministry and encourage more knitters and crocheters to join.

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