waldorf

{Made for Learning} Finger Paint

Do you remember finger paints when you were small?  I remember having little pots of paint, the cool semi-gelatinous texture, and a distinctive smell, not unlike play-doh.  I was five years old.

Finger painting is a wonderful way to introduce little ones to making art.  They have better control of their own fingers than they do a paint brush, and helps them to build a muscle memory of the way certain objects are formed in two dimensions.  Finger painting is an excellent way to re-enforce letter and number formation. It is also a wonderful way to teach children to mix colours.

As they get a little more advanced, finger painting can be a useful introduction to early figure drawing.

Of course, the extent of wonderful artistic activities is only limited by your imagination.  We’d sure love to see what you and your children make with your finger paints!

You’ll need::

  • 1 c. cornstarch
  • 1 c. grated soap (we use plain olive oil soap or goat’s milk soap)
  • 3 c. water
  • 1T. glycerine or white sugar
  • food dyes (we use India Tree plant-based food dye)
  • saucepan
  • bowl
  • wooden spoons
  • 3 flip-top squirt bottles

Also handy::

  • paint pallets
  • pad of large art paper

Gather your supplies... and your little helpers.

 

Pour your cornstarch (cornflour) into the pot...

 

and your sugar...

 

... and add 1 c. of water.

 

Stir and stir until completely dissolved.

 

Grate the soap

 

Luminous curly soap noodles (ours smell like sandalwood)

 

Add the soap curls to the pot.

 

Place pot over medium heat and stir constantly. As the mixture thickens, add as much of the remaining 2c. water to make the gel workable.

 

When it's ready, the mixture will be light and fluffy.

 

Divide the mixture evenly amongst 3 bowls (or however many you want).

 

Add food colouring to each bowl. We used 40 drops each, and obtained soft colours. Your results will vary depending upon the food colouring you choose. Paste colurants will give you the most vibrant colours.

 

Keep stirring until the colour is even.

 

Pour paint through a funnel into your bottles. Remember to thoroughly rinse the funnel between colours.

 

Pretty!

Take out the paper and fill the wells of the pallettes.

 

Magic time.

 

These finger paints can also be used in the bath!  Since they are soapy, they are also washable.  Lovely!

 

 

Tutorial:: Waldorf-style Pocket Doll

I had a yen to make a pocket-sized dolly for each of my small children.  James is particularly fond of having something to tote around in his hand.  I think he really likes it.

Materials:

  • Pattern
  • Scrap of soft fabric (chenille, flannel, recycled sweater)
  • Wool yarn
  • Wool suffing
  • Flesh coloured knit (scrap)
  • Embroidery floss
  • Thread

Cut 1 on the fold just as it is. This is the back of your dolly.

Now fold the hood part down and cut another piece on the fold. This is the front of your dolly.

Slit both pieces to the marking. This will form your dolly's legs.

With your wool yarn, make a ball. Make sure to wrap tightly and evenly.

Keep on winding until your ball measures 4 inches around.

Cover your yarn ball with a nice layer of wool batting in order to make the finished base smooth.

Just like this.

Tie off the batting with cotton string. Wind it 'round a few times first and you'll get a nice 'neck'.

Cut a 5 inch square of flesh coloured knit fabric.

See how many gorgeous colours it comes in?

Smooth the fabric over the head base and tie tightly in place with cotton string.

Choose the best side for the face. Embroider eyes and a mouth about halfway down the face.

Using some embroidery floss or cord in your desired hair colour, wind several times around two fingers.

Tie 'round the middle with sewing thread.

Fold loops over themselves so that all of them are facing you.

Sew securely to the dolly's head. ETA: For a more secure head of hair, you could sew the floss directly into the head, creating loops around a finger.

Snip loops to create a fringe.

 

Set your dolly head aside and take up your front and back pieces. With right sides together, sew arms and legs, leaving ends open. Fold the hood with right sides together and sew the top seam. Leave the face and neck open. Take small hand stitches and make narrow hems.

Sew up the ends of arms and legs like purse strings.

There's little dolly's body all sewn and turned out. Use a knitting needle to poke out the point of the hood and adjust the hands and feet.

 

Make four balls of wool batting - two slightly larger - for hands and feet.

 

Stuff the balls into hands and feet, gather up tightly with thread and bury your knots.

 

Now place the head into the remaining opening, turning the body fabric under slightly. Pin the center top of the hood to the center top of the head. Sew open portions of the arms, and across the neck edge, adjusting the fabric snugly around the chin area. Tack the hood to the head and bury your knots.

 

You're finished! Now your sweet dolly is ready for his or her first cuddle.

 

{Thanks to my daughter Cat for assisting with some of the photographs when I ran out of hands!}

A Little Something


I think he likes it

 

{I’m working on posting the tutorial so that you can make your own}

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